Robot detects high radiation level in No. 2 reactor

February 29, 2012

Quince 2, a robot searching the top floor of the crippled No. 2 reactor building of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, detected radiation levels as high as 220 millisieverts per hour, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said.

The robot, developed by the Chiba Institute of Technology, measured radiation levels throughout the building and took images of the facility in February.

TEPCO, which released data and photographs on Feb. 28, said the information would be used in preparing for the removal of spent fuel rods from the fuel pool at the reactor.

The images appear to show puddles on the floor of the reactor, but TEPCO said it believed they were caused by condensation rather than by the accident.

The robot’s predecessor, Quince, was deployed in June last year, but was abandoned in October after it was immobilized on the building’s third floor and communication was lost.

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Image of the top floor of the No. 2 reactor building of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, taken by the Quince 2 robot. Debris is seen on the floor. (Photo provided by TEPCO)

Image of the top floor of the No. 2 reactor building of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, taken by the Quince 2 robot. Debris is seen on the floor. (Photo provided by TEPCO)

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  • Image of the top floor of the No. 2 reactor building of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, taken by the Quince 2 robot. Debris is seen on the floor. (Photo provided by TEPCO)
  • Image of the top floor of the No. 2 reactor building of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, taken by the Quince 2 robot. The spent fuel pool is seen on the right. (Photo provided by TEPCO)
  • Image of the top floor of the No. 2 reactor building of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, taken by the Quince 2 robot. Seen on the left is the spent fuel pool. (Photo provided by TEPCO)
  • Image of the top floor of the No. 2 reactor building of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, taken by Quince 2, a domestic disaster relief robot. Investigation result by the robot was released on Feb. 28. Rust is visible on the steel roof. (Photo provided by TEPCO)

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