collective self-defense

Abe's special adviser under fire for remarks on Constitution,...
Yosuke Isozaki, special adviser to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in charge of national security (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
The Abe administration found itself battling a politically damaging brush fire of its own making even before deliberations began July 27 in the Upper House on contentious...
In some ways, history regarding national security does repeat...
Fifty-five years ago, in the summer of 1960, Japan experienced socio-political trauma.
Ruling parties to vote on security bills July 15
Citizens express their opposition to proposed security legislation in Kagoshima on July 12. (Yu Kamata)
Ignoring strident public opposition, the ruling parties intend to seek Lower House passage this week of a package of security bills that would significantly expand the overseas ...
ASAHI POLL: Constitutional scholars almost unanimous that security ...
The Asahi Shimbun
Constitutional experts are almost unanimous in their view that planned new security legislation is unconstitutional, according to a survey by The Asahi Shimbun.
Abe has chance to make history with statement marking 70th...
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to the United States at the end of April was a resounding success. One of the main outcomes of the five-day visit was the signing of the new ...
1.65 million signatures submitted to Diet to oppose security bills
Satoshi Kamata (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
A citizens group submitted a petition with about 1.65 million signatures to both chambers of the Diet on June 29 to express opposition to security legislation now under...
Former legislation bureau chiefs criticize security bills as...
Reiichi Miyazaki, a professor at Hosei University and former director-general of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau, addresses members of the Lower House special committee deliberating security legislation on June 22. The other experts called before the panel are, from right, Setsu Kobayashi, professor emeritus at Keio University; Masahiro Sakata, a lawyer and another former director-general of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau; Osamu Nishi, a professor emeritus at Komazawa University; and Satoshi Morimoto, a former defense minister. (Shinichi Iizuka)
Two former heads of the government body that screens the constitutionality of legislative bills criticized security legislation that would greatly expand the overseas role of...
Critics find legislation bureau chief's 'blowfish' remark on...
Yusuke Yokobatake, director-general of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau, speaks during a Lower House special committee on June 19. (Shinichi Iizuka)
A key government bureaucrat defended the constitutionality of new national security legislation by likening it to a poisonous "fugu" blowfish that is made safe to eat after its ...
Opposition party drafts security counterproposal to restrict SDF...
Toru Hashimoto, supreme adviser of the Japan Innovation Party (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
The opposition Japan Innovation Party has compiled its own security legislation proposal that is at odds with the plans of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe concerning overseas...
Constitutional law scholars lash out at government criticism,...
Yasuo Hasebe, left, Waseda University professor, and Setsu Kobayashi, professor emeritus at Keio University, attend a news conference in Tokyo on June 15. (Tetsuro Takehana)
Two constitutional law scholars rebutted government arguments against their conclusion that security legislation before the Diet is unconstitutional, with one saying the Abe...
Constitutional scholars join in chorus of concerns over security...
Panelists participate in a discussion in a symposium held at the University of Tokyo on June 6. From right, Koji Sato, professor emeritus at Kyoto University, Yoichi Higuchi, professor emeritus at the University of Tokyo, and Kenji Ishikawa, professor at the University of Tokyo. At left is the moderator, Atsushi Sugita, professor at Hosei University. (Ryuichi Kitano)
More constitutional scholars on June 6 added to growing academia concerns over the government’s hasty actions to enact security legislation that changes the long-held...
Ruling party rejects scholarly opinion while opposition hammers...
Defense Minister Gen Nakatani, standing at right, responds to questions at the Lower House special committee on June 5 during deliberations on security legislation. (Wataru Sekita)
Debate in the Diet on security legislation that would radically alter Japan's defense posture turned June 5 toward a key factor that triggered the process for writing the bills ...
High school students hold spirited mock Diet session on national...
A student portraying a member of the opposition parties questions the national security bills in a mock Diet session in the Japan Studies class at the American School in Japan in Tokyo's Chofu on June 1. (Midori Iki)
As discussions are occurring in the Diet on national security legislation, high school students held a heated mock session of their own on the same topic in their classroom in...
EDITORIAL: Diet needs to debate constitutionality of security bills
Three constitutional scholars--from left: Yasuo Hasebe, Setsu Kobayashi and Eiji Sasada--attend a session of the Lower House Commission on the Constitution on June 4. (The Asahi Shimbun)
All three constitutional scholars invited to the Diet declared that the package of security bills being considered by the Diet is unconstitutional.
Abe apologizes to Diet once again over heckling incident
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe apologizes at the opening of a Lower House special committee session on June 1 for heckling an opposition lawmaker four days earlier during debate on national security legislation. (Shinichi Iizuka)
A chastened Prime Minister Shinzo Abe apologized again for his outburst during a Diet debate session last week while an opposition lawmaker was addressing the chamber.
Abe apologizes for his rude outburst in debate
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe heckles Kiyomi Tsujimoto of the Democratic Party of Japan by angrily saying, "Ask the question already!" in a Diet debate on national security legislation on May 28. (Shinichi Iizuka)
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe apologized for being rude in a debate in the Diet on May 28.
Abe 'in general' allowing more exceptions for collective...
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe responds to questions about national security legislation at a Lower House special committee session on May 27. (Shinichi Iizuka)
When stressing the limits on overseas deployment of the Self-Defense Forces, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe frequently uses the term “in general,” creating more exceptions to...
Diet debate on security bills starts with confusion over limits on ...
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe enters the Lower House chamber on May 26. (Shinichi Iizuka)
Remarks by Abe administration officials on the possibility of Japan attacking enemy bases sparked confusion before nuts-and-bolts deliberations on national security legislation ...
China defense paper stresses expanding naval strategy, cites U.S., ...
The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (Taken from U.S. Navy's official website)
BEIJING--China will widen the focus of its naval strategy to cover defense of “far oceans” in response to recent shifts in U.S. and Japanese security policies, Beijing’s...
EDITORIAL: Abe's responses to security questions smack of...
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
What stood out in the first debates between Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and opposition party heads in the current Diet session was Abe’s insincere replies that were designed to ...