right to collective self-defense

EDITORIAL: Abe's collective self-defense argument just got shakier
Yusuke Yokobatake, director-general of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau, listens to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in an Upper House Budget Committee session in July. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
A new fact has come to light that undermines the already shaky grounds on which the government’s reinterpretation of the Constitution stands.
VOX POPULI: Bureau’s shady compromise damages its credibility...
Masahiro Sakata, former director-general of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau, testifies in a session of the Lower House special committee deliberating security legislation on June 22. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
The expression "nikumare yaku," which may translate as "the hated party" or "the bad guy," refers to someone whose uncompromising obstinacy makes others resentful and...
EDITORIAL: Flawed record of vote on security bills signals a...
Yoshitada Konoike, left, and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, center, just before the national security legislation was put to a vote at the Upper House special committee on Sept. 17 (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
One month after new national security legislation to allow Japan to exercise the right to collective self-defense was enacted, the newly published minutes of the Upper House...
Former SDF members warn of Japanese deaths under security laws
Yorimasa Ikeda, left, and Suenori Nishikawa (Photos by Taro Saito and Gen Okada)
Some former Self-Defense Forces members are warning that Japan’s new security laws will put current personnel at risk of injury or death overseas, including in wars led by...
EDITORIAL: Passage of security bills marks start of rebuilding...
A crowd of protesters rally against the security legislation near the Diet building early on Sept. 19. (Sayuri Ide)
After Japanese lawmakers passed deeply controversial national security legislation in the early hours on Sept. 19, shouts of pure anger repeatedly burst from protesters who had ...
SDF members ready for greater risks, while families fear for their ...
New recruits of the Self-Defense Forces attend a ceremony in Aichi Prefecture in September. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
Reactions of Self-Defense Forces members to the seemingly inevitable enactment of national security legislation ranged from welcoming their expanded overseas roles to...
VOX POPULI: Abe's flawed logic is bound to backfire at some point
A huge crowd protests the security legislation during a rally near the Diet on Sept. 16. (Takeshi Tokitsu)
Referring to his recent exchange with Defense Minister Gen Nakatani on contentious national security legislation, Hiroyuki Konishi, an Upper House lawmaker of the Democratic...
Ex-chief justice blasts Abe's lack of respect for constitutionalism
Shigeru Yamaguchi, former chief justice of the Supreme Court (Photo by Junko Takahashi)
A former chief justice of the Supreme Court has added his voice to a growing judicial backlash against new national security legislation that legal experts denounce as...
SDF chief told U.S. late last year that security bills would pass...
Demonstrators opposing the security bills pack the streets near the Diet building in Tokyo on Aug. 30. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
The government was so cocky about its stranglehold on power that it sent word to Washington late last year that contentious security legislation now before the Diet would be...
Ex-accused in Sunagawa Incident speaks up to support the pacifist...
Gunichiro Muto, professor emeritus of agriculture at Kyushu University, shares his experiences of being an accused in the trial resulting from the so-called Sunagawa incident at a World War II exhibition in Fukuoka. (Tazuko Goto)
FUKUOKA--Gunichiro Muto remained silent about the so-called Sunagawa Incident for many many years.
Abe signals possible minesweeping in South China Sea, a shift from ...
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe answers a question July 29 from a member of the Upper House at a special committee where the government’s security bills are being debated. (Shinichi Iizuka)
Japan could conduct minesweeping operations in the South China Sea, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said July 29 in an about-turn which suggested a desire to expand collective...
EDITORIAL: Basic security questions remain unanswered, eroding...
Demonstrators hold placards that read, “We do not tolerate Abe's politics” at a protest in Fukuoka on July 18. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
The Upper House on July 27 started deliberating the package of government-drafted national security bills that recently cleared the Lower House.
EDITORIAL: Japan’s postwar progress outrageously reversed
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, center, leaves the Lower House special committee just before the vote on the security bills on July 15. (Shogo Koshida)
The ruling coalition led by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe railroaded a package of controversial security bills through a Lower House special committee on July 15.
VOX POPULI: Public anger bound to grow over Abe's contemptuous...
Yoichi Higuchi, professor emeritus at the University of Tokyo, center, and other constitutional law experts meet reporters in Tokyo on June 24. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
The Japanese word "bujoku" means "to humiliate someone in public by treating the person with contempt."
Group of experts demands new security legislation be killed
Former Assistant Chief Cabinet Secretary Kyoji Yanagisawa speaks in a symposium on the right to collective self-defense in Sapporo in June 2014. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
A group of experts, including constitutional law scholars and a former Cabinet Legislation Bureau chief, have released a statement demanding the scuttling of the new security...
Minesweeping exercise held off Iwojima island
A bomb attached to a mine explodes in a Maritime Self-Defense Force training exercise held off Iwojima in Tokyo’s Ogasawara archipelago on June 24. (Yusuke Fukui)
The Maritime Self-Defense Force conducted a minesweeping exercise June 24 off Iwojima island in Tokyo’s Ogasawara archipelago.
EDITORIAL: Scrap Abe's security bills to end the confusion,...
A sit-in to protest security legislation is held in front of the Diet building in central Tokyo on June 15. (Kazuhiro Nagashima)
It is simply extraordinary that the legitimacy of legislation before the Diet has been questioned to such an extent.
VOX POPULI: Abe twists the Constitution to fit a hole of his own...
Yusuke Yokobatake, director-general of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau, answers questions June 10 from an opposition lawmaker during a Lower House special committee on national security legislation. (Rei Kishitsu)
"It won't get any larger than the size it is now, but it could shrink to the size it was before," may be one way to paraphrase the Shinzo Abe administration's answer to a...
Abe administration on security bills: Constitutional law scholars...
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Yasuo Hasebe, professor of constitutional law at Waseda University, have different views on the constitutionality of security legislation. (Asahi Shimbun file photos)
The government on June 9 rejected the conclusion of three constitutional scholars that security legislation allowing Japan to exercise the right to collective self-defense is...
Abe stresses 'peace and safety' in security legislation
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe explains the “peace and safety legislation” at a news conference in Tokyo on May 14. (Hikaru Uchida)
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe emphasized that Cabinet-approved security legislation is intended to protect Japan and will not lead the nation to become embroiled in a war led by...