science

Researchers create reagent to make plants see-through
The reagent ClearSee makes a thale cress pistil translucent so scientists can study the structure of its pollen tubes. (Provided by Nagoya University)
NAGOYA--Scientists at Nagoya University have developed a reagent that makes plants translucent, allowing them to observe specimens on a cellular level under a microscope...
Study: Omura's drug for river blindness could treat biliary tract...
Nobel Prize laureate Satoshi Omura receives another award at the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building on Dec. 22. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
An antiparasitic drug developed by Nobel Prize laureate Satoshi Omura could help patients fight biliary tract cancer, but securing safety for such treatments remains an issue,...
The tiny tube with a big future--but when will carbon nanotubes...
Zeon Corp.'s new single-walled carbon nanotube plant in Shunan, Yamaguchi Prefecture, started operation on Nov. 11.  (Provided by Zeon Corp.)
SHUNAN, Yamaguchi Prefecture--From the long-fabled space elevator to bendable computers, the possibilities of carbon nanotubes are endless.
Asthma drug viewed as Alzheimer’s research breakthrough
A medicine used to treat asthma may also be effective for Alzheimer’s disease, Japanese scientists said in a study published Dec. 16.
Lab-grown heart, pancreatic tissue could be tested on humans soon
A human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell (Provided by Shinya Yamanaka)
Heart muscles and pancreatic cells grown by scientists could be tested on humans in just a few years, according to the science ministry.
Hayabusa 2 throws itself toward target asteroid in Earth swingby
The path of space probe Hayabusa 2 passing by Earth in a swingby is seen in a 30-second exposure photo taken using an equatorial mount in Setana, Hokkaido, shortly before 7 p.m. on Dec. 3. The bright light at the bottom is Capella, a first magnitude star of the constellation Auriga. (Kotaro Ebara)
The Hayabusa 2 asteroid explorer performed a successful swingby past Earth before heading full speed toward uncharted territory hundreds of thousands of kilometers away on Dec. ...
Happy part of human brain found by Kyoto scientists
THE ASAHI SHIMBUN
Tap the right side of your head and you are getting close to the source of human happiness.
Breakthrough to pave way for cheaper fuel cells requiring no...
Seiji Ogo, a professor of bioinorganic chemistry at Kyushu University (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
FUKUOKA--Fuel cells are expected to become less expensive thanks to a new type of electrocatalyst for cathodes that does not require costly platinum, according to a team of...
High-purity nanotubes to roll off Zeon production line in world...
Sumio Iijima, an honorary lifetime professor at Meijo University (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
Chemicals manufacturer Zeon Corp. said it will become the world's first company on Nov. 11 to begin mass production of a high-purity carbon nanotube for use in cellphones and...
Japanese scientists cast light on origin of life by forming...
Microscopic images of artificial cells undergoing the process of replication published in the scientific journal Nature Communications (Provided by Tadashi Sugawara)
A team of Japanese scientists has inched closer to figuring out how the first cells emerged from the primordial soup that gave birth to life eons ago.
Love is in the eyes between dogs and owners, say scientists
A student at Azabu University in Kanagawa Prefecture gazes at a dog during an experiment on the effect of eye-to-eye contact between humans and another species. (Provided by Mikako Mimura)
Making eyes at your dog leads to more than mere puppy love.
Botanists link origin of Yoshino cherry blossoms to Ueno Park tree
A Yoshino cherry tree standing next to the statue of Prince Komatsu Akihito in Tokyo's Ueno Park is speculated to be the first of the species that is nowadays seen widely across Japan. (Teruhiko Nose)
The majority of sakura trees that will bloom across Japan in a few weeks may have derived from one standing in Tokyo's Ueno Park, according to scientists at Chiba University.
Drink more black tea for stronger bones, researchers say
The Asahi Shimbun
More black tea may just be what people with fragile bones need to maintain a healthier skeleton, according to research published Feb. 24 by Japanese scientists.
Hitachi develops world's most powerful electron microscope
The electron microscope developed by Hitachi Ltd. boasts the world's highest  resolution. (Provided by Hitachi Ltd.)
Electronics giant Hitachi Ltd. said it developed a massive transmission electron microscope with record-breaking resolution powers that allow scientists to peer even deeper...
Jawbone found in waters off Taiwan could belong to new species of...
The fossilized remains of Penghu Man's lower jawbone in Taipei on Jan. 27 (Satoshi Ukai)
TAIPEI--A fossilized jawbone snagged in a fishing net off western Taiwan may belong to a previously unknown species of early man, according to a study released by a team of...
INTERVIEW/ Hideki Shirakawa: Scientists need freedom of basic...
Hideki Shirakawa oversees children during a lab class at the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo. (Eiji Hori)
The number of Nobel Prize winners from Japan topped 20 on Dec. 10, with this year’s physics prize awarded to a trio of Japan-born scientists for their studies on blue...
Global eco-radiation research institute opens in Fukushima
The germanium semiconductor detector at Fukushima University's Institute of Environmental Radioactivity on Dec. 3 (Yukiko Kiyono)
FUKUSHIMA--With its team of international researchers, Fukushima University’s Institute of Environmental Radioactivity moved into full-scale operation on Dec. 3.
After surprise discovery, researchers make mice transparent
A new technique makes the entire body of a mouse transparent except its eyes and bones. (Provided by Riken)
Japanese researchers have created mice that are almost entirely transparent, a development that could lead to improved treatments for damaged organs, according to a recently...
Cryopreservation of mice testes offers young cancer patients...
Mice for experimental use (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
Japanese scientists have produced offspring for the first time from sperm generated from testicular tissue that had been removed from newborn mice and then frozen, giving hope...
Riken orders reassessment of old research papers
Ryoji Noyori, president of the Riken national research institute (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
With the controversy unsettled over a supposed groundbreaking stem cell study, the Riken national research institute has ordered about 280 senior researchers to assess past...